Erika Boudreau-Barbee – New York, New York

“I Bit The Dust”   Performance. Materials: mineral dust, dye, center hanging lightbulb, stage. 2014

“I Bit The Dust”
Performance. Materials: mineral dust, dye, center hanging lightbulb, stage. 2014

Briefly describe the work you do.

My art is usually derived from thought and the hopscotch mapping of my mind bursting with free exploration. What my choreographic work attempts to bring forward is the visually appealing and the visually repulsive showing them to be equally captivating. My dance is sourced from my gut while my choreography is tasked. My art is an experiment of not only human reaction but human interaction. Often found in my work is discomfort coming from a natural place composed with irony and contradiction. I explore humanity’s energy force with its relation to the world and call on societal expansion. Lately, I have been expanding from dance and choreography into social and political based conceptual performances.

Tell us a little about your background and how that influences you as an artist.

I grew up dancing with my older sister in Tigard, Oregon and began teaching and choreographing by the time I reached high school. I thank my peers from NYU Tisch School of the Arts for challenging me not only as a dancer but expanding my mind as an artist. Although my mode of presentation is in performance, I use a variety of mediums to create the final product including painting and writing poetry. I use text to create most of my phrase work although it may be completely unrelated to the concept. The Bhagavad Gita is a personal favorite. I am influenced heavily by eastern energy work and healing techniques. I write in stream of consciousness form which I then will translate into movement. I am inspired by past experiences, past lives, time, space, other dimensions, creatures, the universe in chaos and the universe in order, magnetic energy, elements, and circles.

.   “From The Top” Performance. Materials: black tempra paint, white fabric, red wine, black balloons, rope, ladder. Rigging materials: sand, stone, barrels, nails, harness, iron rods, rope. 2014

. “From The Top”
Performance. Materials: black tempra paint, white fabric, red wine, black balloons, rope, ladder. Rigging materials: sand, stone, barrels, nails, harness, iron rods, rope. 2014

The concept of the “artist studio” has a broad range of meanings, especially in contemporary practice. The idea of the artist toiling away alone in a room may not necessarily reflect what many artists do from day to day anymore. Describe your studio practice and how it differs from (or is the same as) traditional notions of “being in the studio.

My studio changes. Most of my thinking is done on the NYC subway. I am curious about human nature so it is a prime place for observations. Depending on the time of day, it brings my mind chaos or clarity, both are useful. My movement is best accomplished in an empty room. I feel I am constantly creating and it doesn’t matter the space I am in as long as I write it in my journal. What matters is my state of mind. I change the energy of the space to be conducive to creating.

What unique roles do you see yourself as the artist playing that you may not have envisioned yourself in when you first started making art?

My roles continue to change. But I would prefer not to do the business end of this and the self promoting, its not where my head is. I am too floaty to do that job well.

When do you find is the best time of day to make art? Do you have time set aside every day, every week or do you just work whenever you can?

The best time is when it hits you. If it smacks me in the face or crawls with Kundalini up my spine I know I have to stop what I am doing and let it take over. It is the most honest work.

.    “Fours & 12’s” Performance. Movement material was crafted in collaboration with the paintings of Andrzej Rafalowicz. 2014

. “Fours & 12’s”
Performance. Movement material was crafted in collaboration with the paintings of Andrzej Rafalowicz. 2014

How has your work changed in the last five years? How is it the same?

Well to be honest two years ago I didn’t know I would be calling myself an artist, I knew myself only as a dancer. I have moved from not just choreographing modern contemporary works but into conceptual performance art. I toy with audience interaction and enjoy questioning social norms, encouraging the taboo.

Are there people such as family, friends, writers, philosophers or even pop icons that have had an impact on the work you do?

Sasha Waltz, Pina Bausch, Carolee Scheemann, Ralph Lemon, Patti Smith. But I am inspired by the beauty of the people and earth I am surrounded by everyday. The artists mentioned impact how I make art, but the people and earth open my spirit and tell me what I need to make.

If you had an occupation outside of being an artist, what would that be and why?

Reiki practitioner, naturopathic doctor, gardener, pilot, wine taster, travel blog writer, sustainable farmer, herbalist, motivational coach, physical therapist, interior designer, artifact, kindergarten teacher, tree house builder, travel agent, peace corps member, baker, yoga instructor, poet, flower arranger, dog walker, zoologist, explorer, archeologist, interpreter, philanthropist. I am curious about too many things to pick just one.

About

1ERIKA BOUDREAU-BARBEE is an artist whose dance training started in Oregon and has led her throughout the US and to Italy, Israel, Germany, and Spain. She graduated with a BFA in dance from Tisch School of the Arts at New York University. When in New York City she dances for Pilar Castro-Kiltz as a member of Ensemble Dance. In the past year she has premiered two performance art works, a film, and paintings at a gallery in Berlin, Germany as an artist in residence and spent three months flirting with performance in Belalcazar, Spain at La Fragua Artist Residency. In Spain, she collaborated with visual artists, performed at various shows, and premiered works at a split exhibition event. She is expanding from dance and choreography into social and political based conceptual performances. Boudreau-Barbee hopes to integrate art with healing and take a ride on creativity’s power.

place I hang out most, the floor

place I hang out most, the floor

erikabb.com

All images copyright of the artist and used with their permission.  

 

 

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Sara Willadsen – Sheboygan Falls, Wisconsin

“Woolly Eyes,” Laser-cut paper, acrylic paint, graphite, gel pen, ink, found images on paper, 22¾" x 22¾", 2014

“Woolly Eyes,” Laser-cut paper, acrylic paint, graphite, gel pen, ink, found images on paper, 22¾” x 22¾”, 2014

Briefly describe the work you do.

I make pictures that satisfy my curiosity in aesthetics and found materials. Combining these articles with reappropriations of my own work allows me to employ past patterns and marks as prompts for new structures and environments. The aggressive process used to construct these secretive spaces is kept in balance with the consciousness to know when to stop.

Tell us a little about your background and how that influences you as an artist.

I was born and raised in Sheboygan Falls, Wisconsin. Like most artists, I started creating things at a very young age. I was constantly restless and wanting to make something, as I have always been a highly visual person and needed to be occupied with some kind of project. Living in a small quiet town helped to foster my curiosity in art and led me to pursue many of my artistic interests at a young age including painting, photography, and various crafts.

“Front,” Laser-cut paper, graphite, latex, hum

“Front,” Laser-cut paper, graphite, latex, hum

The concept of the “artist studio” has a broad range of meanings, especially in contemporary practice. The idea of the artist toiling away alone in a room may not necessarily reflect what many artists do from day to day anymore. Describe your studio practice and how it differs from (or is the same as) traditional notions of “being in the studio.”

My studio practice is primarily a solitary one.

Since I like to begin a piece with some kind of wash or mark(s) already on the surface, I often reappropriate many of my own paintings and drawings as well as found pieces, often ones with unintentional and chance marks. These then become prompts for new spaces.  

I rely heavily on pareidolia to pull ideas from my subconscious and bring order to the chaotic marks left behind. This psychological phenomenon tricks the brain into seeing whole objects from fractured information. When I see abstract images or designs my mind fills in the gaps so that I see structures and planes. My mind searches out spaces to explore in everything I observe, so I start with a jumbled mess of unrecognizable shapes and pull out a space I see in it with pencil marks and continued patterns. These prompts usually result in structures and spaces that resemble places I have recently encountered or experiences from my past that have visually stuck with me.

I often move from one piece to the next so I am always working on multiple pieces.

What unique roles do you see yourself as the artist playing that you may not have envisioned yourself in when you first started making art?

When I started going to school for art I never really thought about the external effect I would have on others, but I have come to find that through teaching and engaging with younger artists, I have become somewhat of a role model.  I think my current studio practice reassures and demonstrates to other aspiring artists that they can successfully pursue their own practice just as I observe with well-known artists that have taught me and/or influenced my work.

When do you find is the best time of day to make art? Do you have time set aside every day, every week or do you just work whenever you can? 

I feel that my brain functions at its best at night, but I work on pieces whenever I have the opportunity. Since I work as a freelance graphic designer during the week I have to devote nights and weekends to my studio practice.

“Middle Ground,” Laser-cut paper, fabric, graphite, charcoal, and acrylic on paper, 26” x 26”, 2014

“Middle Ground,” Laser-cut paper, fabric, graphite, charcoal, and acrylic on paper, 26” x 26”, 2014

How has your work changed in the last five years? How is it the same?

When I began painting and drawing five years ago in undergrad, I created a lot of desolate night scenes from around Sheboygan County. My interest in landscapes is still present in my current work as I take inspiration from some the same Sheboygan surroundings, but in a less straightforward and representational way. I now combine these ideas with found materials and other ephemera I collect to create an image of a new environment.

Are there people such as family, friends, writers, philosophers or even pop icons that have had an impact on the work you do?

One of my former professors, Geoffrey Todd Smith, has made a great impact on my studio practice. During a studio visit with him in grad school, he suggested that I give myself rules to work by so I don’t always resort to my default instincts, which to me can get stale and too repetitive. I am very open and receptive to experimentation in my work, so this method continuously keeps me engaged in what I am making and often leads me in exciting directions.

I draw much of my inspiration from artists such as Mark Whalen and Edward Hopper as well as my surroundings and places I see every day.

If you had an occupation outside of being an artist, what would that be and why?

I think I would have some type of non-profit job that works with animals. I have always been concerned with the well-being of all animals and could never commit to a career that doesn’t align with my morals, so this would probably be one of the only other jobs besides being an artist that would make me feel like I’m making a positive contribution to the world.

About

Headshot_WilladsenSara Willadsen was born in Sheboygan, WI in 1987. She received her Master of Fine Arts Degree in Painting from Northern Illinois University in 2014 and her Bachelor of Arts Degree from Lakeland College in 2010. Working predominantly with paint and various found materials, Willadsen’s work explores ideas of abstract spaces and structures inspired by her childhood spent in Sheboygan County. She has had work shown at the Museum of Wisconsin Art and exhibits frequently in group exhibitions. Willadsen lives and works as a visual artist and freelance designer in Sheboygan.
Studies

Studies

www.sarawilladsen.com

All images copyright of the artist and used with their permission.  

 

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Uriel Ziv – Kfar Saba Israel

con with Stomach Problems (2014) Sculpture combines light, and movement. Materials: Plexiglas, stainless steel, aluminum, fan, LED light. Diameter: 110 cm. Height : 50 cm.

con with Stomach Problems (2014)
Sculpture combines light, and movement.
Materials: Plexiglas, stainless steel, aluminum, fan, LED light.
Diameter: 110 cm.
Height : 50 cm.

Briefly describe the work you do.

I base my artwork on the need to integrate motion, or something that hints at motion (e.g. video, light, sound, motors, etc.), in passive objects. Also, by including disruption, repetition and the use of modern and digital means of expression, I try to connect the physical movement within or outside of the object with the restlessness of “today’s eye”, one that moves sporadically between screens, signs, storefronts, and so on.

Tell us a little about your background and how that influences you as an artist.

I grew up in Israel, in a Haredi Jewish family. My family’s daily lives and ideological disposition revolved around strict religious laws (including a great deal of praying, Torah study, prohibitions and intimidations). The individual had no place in this way of life, you couldn’t voice any doubts, and there was just one truth – the belief in God’s laws.

Naturally, this environment didn’t tolerate any notions of culture, so philosophy and art were out of bounds, and TV, movies and computers were forbidden – these were seen as impure. Fortunately, I was a curious child and wanted to learn about the “outside world”, so I built a secret chest, where I stored a TV with a connected VCR, and when my parents were away, I would take the TV out and watch movies (I watched dozens of movies like this…).

I think that this was a turning point, when I developed a “hunger” for creating reflexive objects and images that solicit questions from people on their essence, and don’t have any absolute truths.

The concept of the “artist studio” has a broad range of meanings, especially in contemporary practice. The idea of the artist toiling away alone in a room may not necessarily reflect what many artists do from day to day anymore. Describe your studio practice and how it differs from (or is the same as) tradition notions of “being in the studio”.

When I work on a physical object that contains or is placed near video, I divide my work into two spaces: I have a space within my house, which I call “soft space”, and I have space outside my house, which I call “hard space”.

Physically, conceptually and ironically, “hard space” is truly hard, since it is a public shelter – a place to run away to in times of war (a situation all too common in our area, which leads to the unavoidable comparison between destruction and creation, between defense and defenselessness, and between being safe and being as insecure as the others). I use this space for the physical, or “dirty” work that my object requires. Conversely, the “soft space” is a room in my house with a computer for whatever digital or technological work my object requires.

As for how I work, the object sometimes dictates that I need to work in video, and sometimes, the opposite is true. The “idea” is above and in front of them.

What unique roles do you see yourself as the artist playing that you may not have envisioned yourself in when you first started making art?

When I started making art, I was skeptical and very doubtful of the digital world and its connection to art. Today, I understand its power (for good and bad…) and how it can be used to build the future. I also appreciate that my mission as an artist is to play an active, positive, critical, and productive role, since the media shapes the future of the freedom and liberty of mankind.

When do you find is the best time of day to make art? Do you have time set aside every day, every week or do you just work whenever you can?

I work whenever I can (I try to work every day). I prefer to do my computer work at night, because nighttime is accompanied by a certain “cinematic mysteriousness” that lends itself well to working with video. When I physically work on an object, I prefer to work in the daytime, since this is when my awareness and physical ability are at the highest level.

Vesicle (2013) Sculpture combines: Aluminum, tablet screen, video, fake fur , wood, mirror. Dimensions: 116 X 74 cm. Video loop: 3:11 min' (no sound).

Vesicle (2013)
Sculpture combines: Aluminum, tablet screen, video, fake fur , wood, mirror.
Dimensions: 116 X 74 cm.
Video loop: 3:11 min’ (no sound).

How has your work changed in the last five years? How is it the same?

At first, I was more interested in creating video projects that investigated the language of video, not so much in the context of cinema as in the context of sculpture. I would also take photographs of real characters, and not computer renditions, in outdoor spaces. Over time, I realized that I didn’t need to take photographs outside, and that whatever I needed was nearby, so I started to combine studio photography with the use of ready-made digitally-processed video materials. I also used to project video onto walls and objects, while today, I’m more interested in combining an object’s static physical nature with the dynamic nature of video. I see video as something that is more abstract, something that can be manipulated.

Are there people such as family, friends, writers, philosophers or even pop icons that have had an impact on the work you do?

There are many, I will not list them at the moment. But I can recommend this book, from 1940, a book called, “The Invention of Morel” , by the writer ‘Adolfo Bioy Casares’. This is a prophetic book which is very relevant to the current period and even more relevant for years to come.

If you had an occupation outside of being an artist, what would that be and why?

Marine biologist.

I grew up near the sea, which, for me, became a kind of shelter, a place for introspection and finding freedom. Like space, I find the depths of the sea fascinating and mysterious. We don’t know too much about the organisms and microorganisms in the water.

Creatures that were discovered and studied until today are artistic masterpieces in their own rite. They glow and illuminate, and they have unusual shapes and textures. They also contain the conceptual and spatial elements of good art. I’m referring to interesting combinations and contrasts that create uncertainty and leave room for questions. For me, the depths of the sea and the organisms that live there are a universe that exists in parallel with the history of art: Complex, abstract, minimalist and expressionist creatures live together in one place. Some move, some do not, some create light, and some have no light.

As an artist and as an individual, I see the sea and its depths as an inexhaustible source of inspiration.

About

image001Uriel Ziv (b.1981) is a multi-media artist, currently living and working in Kfar Saba Israel.

In 2013 he received his BFA Degree in New Media from Bezalel, Academy of Art and Design, Jerusalem, Israel. (He received Award for Graduation Exhibition)

His work was shown in several group exhibitions in 2014 he had a solo exhibition at the Ramat Gan Museum, Israel.

At the moment he is working on several projects including outdoor sculptures, exhibitions, and collaborations with other artists.

www.urielziv.com

All images copyright of the artist and used with their permission.  

Posted in Digital Art, Digital Media, Kinetic Sculpture, Multi Media, New Media, Video Sculpture | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Mena Ganey – Roswell, Georgia

Cowboy_40'' x 44''_2014

Cowboy_40” x 44”_2014

Briefly describe the work you do.

I have questions that need answers. My artwork is me trying to figure out how to physically make some sort of answer.  Right now I’m focused on the peculiar problem of people identifying southwest art with cowboys, cactus, and Native Americans dresses from two hundred years ago.

Tell us a little about your background and how that influences you as an artist.

I think I’ve always seen things different. As a six year old I used to knock on strangers doors and ask to photograph their loving rooms. At eleven I spray painted a silver 16 x 16 square in a scrub Forest because I thought people hiking through would think it was magical. I was fearless with an over-active imagination born into a family that enjoyed combing through dumps, exploring caves; very unusual sites. My dad is a scientist who loved/loves to go to bazaar roadside attractions; alligator farms definitely proved memorable. My mother was and is a fabulous photographer. They both taught me to be curious about the ordinary.

Harmonica, 36" x 48", acrylic and resin, 2014

Harmonica, 36″ x 48″, acrylic and resin, 2014

The concept of the “artist studio” has a broad range of meanings, especially in contemporary practice. The idea of the artist toiling away alone in a room may not necessarily reflect what many artists do from day to day anymore. Describe your studio practice and how it differs from (or is the same as) traditional notions of “being in the studio.”

My studio practice, although I have a physical space, is largely in my head. I carry a note pad wherever I go or I’ll dictate through my phone. I have an office/laboratory/studio/dojo where I paint and perform tests.

What unique roles do you see yourself as the artist playing that you may not have envisioned yourself in when you first started making art?

I never really saw myself getting into instillation or video art. I became very passionate about both my last year of grad school.

When do you find is the best time of day to make art? Do you have time set aside every day, every week or do you just work whenever you can? 

I’m actually a midday person I would start at 10 and go till about eight. Right now I’m creating on Sundays which is frankly not enough time for me but the reality is there are only so many hours in the day, and days in the week.

Saguaro, 16''x20', 2014

Saguaro, 16”x20′, 2014

How has your work changed in the last five years? How is it the same?

My work dramatically changed in the last five years. I feel that it’s much more cohesive and achievable- not so pie-in-the-sky anymore.

Are there people such as family, friends, writers, philosophers or even pop icons that have had an impact on the work you do?

My family. I think my son, Shannon has had the largest impact on my life. He’s a fantastic person. My friends as well. I have some fantastic artist friends.

I don’t want to say there’s one single person that launched something. It’s been a series of moments. I remember standing in front of an Anselm Kiefer and bawling. I love listening to Debussy in Fall. That kind of hopeless romantic shit.

If you had an occupation outside of being an artist, what would that be and why?

If I has another occupation outside of an artist? I’ve been very fortunate in my life that I get to make art everywhere I go and whatever I do.
I work for High Road Ice Cream presently. Last week we made strawberry ice cream and as I evened out the pan the strawberry drug through fresh vanilla anglaise leaving tiny beautiful trails of seeds.

About

IMG_2720Mena Ganey is an American artist, currently living in Atlanta, Georgia. In 2009 she completed her BFA in painting at Arizona State University, and in 2013 completed her MFA at the University of Arizona. She works primarily in the realms of installation, painting, printmaking and video, and has exhibited throughout the United States. Mena’s work explores the systems, archives, and values ascribed through visual culture.

IMG_9690

www.menaganey.com

All images copyright of the artist and used with their permission. 

 

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Chloe Feldman Emison – Boston, Massachusetts

Hardwick, I, pen and ink and wash, 31 x 27,” 2013.

Hardwick, I, pen and ink and wash, 31 x 27,” 2013.

Briefly describe the work you do.

Other than that, the work varies greatly.  Sometimes it is representational and sometimes not; sometimes very meticulous and sometimes not; sometimes in black and white and sometimes in color.  Sometimes the body is monstrous and sometimes not.

Tell us a little about your background and how that influences you as an artist.

I was homeschooled and visited many museums from an early age.  My parents encouraged me to draw to keep me occupied in museums, and in general whenever I had to wait for them before I was old enough to read.  I was a ballet student for many years; that has been important both to my drawings and to my ambition to design costume and sets.

The concept of the “artist studio” has a broad range of meanings, especially in contemporary practice. The idea of the artist toiling away alone in a room may not necessarily reflect what many artists do from day to day anymore. Describe your studio practice and how it differs from (or is the same as) traditional notions of “being in the studio.”

I live and work in rather cramped quarters at present, so being in my studio means being at my drawing desk.

After the Performance, XI, pen and inks, including metallic, and water- color, 35 x 28”, 2014.

After the Performance, XI, pen and inks, including metallic, and water-
color, 35 x 28”, 2014.

What unique roles do you see yourself as the artist playing that you may not have envisioned yourself in when you first started making art?

I had the opportunity to draw from cadavers, and the beauty of the interior organs has been an important revelation for me. I have done some wallpaper and fabric designs.

When do you find is the best time of day to make art? Do you have time set aside every day, every week or do you just work whenever you can? 

I work when I am not at my day (my very early morning until mid-afternoon) job.

Icon,VII, dip pen and ink and gold leaf, 30 x 25”, 2014.

Icon,VII, dip pen and ink and gold leaf, 30 x 25”, 2014.

How has your work changed in the last five years? How is it the same?

I am willing to work on a large scale, I now work non-representationally as well as representationally, I am willing to make things that won’t be liked.  The theme of performers seen off-stage goes back several years, and in general my style is recognizably the same.  I tend to work on imagery in series, and the series are developed over a number of years.

Are there people such as family, friends, writers, philosophers or even pop icons that have had an impact on the work you do?

Nabokov, Grand Budapest Hotel, Jacques Tati

If you had an occupation outside of being an artist, what would that be and why?

Pastry cook, because I like small-scale design.

About

cfe-headshotChloe Feldman Emison has shown her drawings widely in the United States and Europe, while also making animations (stop-motion) and illustrations. She studied fine art at Williams College and at the Ruskin School of Drawing and Fine Art, Oxford University, and animation at Forkbeard Fantasy in Devon. She was a visiting artist at Wasps Studios in Glasgow, and completed residencies at the Contemporary Artists Center in Woodside, N.Y., at The Old School Art House in Iceland, at the Vermont Studio Center, and at Can Serrat, near Barcelona. In 2013 she taught animation at the Eagle Hill School in Hardwick, Massachusetts. She has collaborated with the Elements Contemporary Ballet company in Chicago on the design of a new ballet about Atlantis slated for 2016. She was named the Mixed Media Artist of the Year for 2009 at the Cambridge Art Association, won a Spotlight on the Arts Award for Outstanding Emerging Artist in 2010, and a Board of Trustees Award from the Silvermine Art Center in New Canaan, Connecticut (2014).

The Studio

The Studio

chloefeldmanemison.com

All images copyright of the artist and used with their permission. 

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Rose Emanuela Briccetti – Santa Barbara, California

Collage and polymer etching on paper 15"x11"

Collage and polymer etching on paper
15″x11″

Briefly describe the work you do.

The existential plight of the modern worker, whether described by Marx or satirized in Dilbert, permeates the Western collective consciousness. My work aims to explore the alienation of the paper pusher, revealing the absurdity of this struggle through humor and nostalgia.

Tell us a little about your background and how that influences you as an artist.

As a little kid, my dad ran a small technology company. I remember going into his office and seeing all these big machines and colorful wires everywhere, and that imagery has always been in my head. My family moved around a bit as a result of corporate takeovers and layoffs and restructuring, so the struggle of the modern worker always loomed large in my life. I have a BFA in painting from Washington University in St. Louis, and since graduating have worked in an office during the day and made art in the off hours. My current day job at a
natural history museum and aquarium has influenced my work a lot, and my recent series of prints are all based on actual events in my day job. Whether it’s a giant squid case that’s leaking toxic chemicals or a plumbing crisis in the jellyfish exhibit, there’s always some kind of crazy crisis that calls me away from checking emails and going to meetings like a normal office worker. The absurdity of these events has become a metaphor to me for the greater absurdity of the whole nine-to-five world.

Working at a Snail's Pace Polymer etching on paper 15"x11"

Working at a Snail’s Pace
Polymer etching on paper
15″x11″

The concept of the “artist studio” has a broad range of meanings, especially in contemporary practice. The idea of the artist toiling away alone in a room may not necessarily reflect what many artists do from day to day anymore. Describe your studio practice and how it differs from (or is the same as) traditional notions of “being in the studio.”

My studio practice is fairly non-traditional in that I don’t have one set space I use to make art. I work on my laptop at home or the coffee shop sketching and composing. I paint in my living room. I print at the local community college or at a friend’s studio. I have access to a wood shop and work space through my day job, so I end up working all over the place.

What unique roles do you see yourself as the artist playing that you may not have envisioned yourself in when you first started making art?

Writing about my art is a continuous point of internal contention for me. A picture is worth a thousand words and trying to translate everything I say visually into text (like answering this question!) is never easy. But writing is crucial to my studio practice and helps me crystalize ideas and clarify my vision. I know the process is valuable even when I’ve been staring at my computer for an hour, stymied by writers block.

When do you find is the best time of day to make art? Do you have time set aside every day, every week or do you just work whenever you can? 

My art making schedule varies a lot! I got involved with a printmaking group at the local community college where they have a press and a set schedule, but I also do a lot of work whenever I can. I do a lot of composing and sketching on the computer which is nice because it’s easy to work anytime.

detail from Boss's Lap Oil on canvas 20"x16"

detail from Boss’s Lap
Oil on canvas
20″x16″

How has your work changed in the last five years? How is it the same?

I’ve always been interested in humor and nostalgia and making things in a very touched, handmade and physical way. It’s been just over 5 years since I started really exploring imagery of retro office workers. I started with this kind of imagery as a general trope, but recently my work has become much more autobiographical and inspired by specific events occurring at my day job. I’ve also begun exploring printmaking in the last 2 years which has helped me think more about my making process.

Are there people such as family, friends, writers, philosophers or even pop icons that have had an impact on the work you do?

I’m influenced by absurdist office humor like Dilbert, The Office, and Office Space. Mad Men is on the pop-culture-influences list as well. I try to read theory as much as I can; Marx, Weber, Durkheim, de Bouvier, Benjamin and McLuhan have definitely helped shape my world view and artistic vision. Becuase I’m making semi-autobiographical art about work and the workplace, I’d say my coworkers, bosses, vendors, and professional colleagues are all influences.

If you had an occupation outside of being an artist, what would that be and why?

I currently do exhibit design for a natural history museum and aquarium during the day, and that’s a pretty cool gig. I got to help install a T-Rex skeleton a few years back, I’ve sat in on dolphin necropsies—there’s always something weird and gross and interesting going on, and that keeps things exciting!

About

RBriccettiHeadshotRose Emanuela Briccetti (b. 1985)  lives and works in Santa Barbara, CA. She holds a BFA in Painting from Washington University in St. Louis where she received the prestigious Wacks Scholarship in painting. She has exhibited at SOMArts (San Francisco, CA), The Dickinson Museum Center (Dickinson, ND), Gallery M Squared (Houston, TX), and the Des Lee Gallery (St. Louis, MO).

Work Shoes, 2008 Oil on canvas 22"x28"

Work Shoes, 2008
Oil on canvas
22″x28″

www.rosebriccetti.com

All images copyright of the artist and used with their permission. 

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Janina Anderson – Washington, DC

Meaning Structures (Yellow Structure), Cut and Woven oil on Canvas, Yarn, Wire, Dimensions Variable,  2014

Meaning Structures (Yellow Structure), Cut and Woven oil on Canvas, Yarn, Wire, Dimensions Variable, 2014

Briefly describe the work you do.

I work in a variety of mediums creating work that interacts with the human figure. I’m very interested in our relationship to the body, how it informs identity, and how these issues can be expressed through materials.

Tell us a little about your background and how that influences you as an artist.

I don’t like sameness. I grew up in a multicultural household and changed schools every two to three years. I’ve always felt that there is nothing more important to personal development than the challenge of new experience. Consequently I’ve spent a lot of time in my life and work concentrating on how we form identity, and how that identity changes or is affected by your physical and emotional environment.

The concept of the “artist studio” has a broad range of meanings, especially in contemporary practice. The idea of the artist toiling away alone in a room may not necessarily reflect what many artists do from day to day anymore. Describe your studio practice and how it differs from (or is the same as) traditional notions of “being in the studio.”

“Out of sight out of mind” is big for me. While this doesn’t usually contribute to the most organized or minimalist environment, I end up surrounded by everything I’m thinking about. The project’s biggest influences are always at hand. The walls are usually covered with notes, bits of fabric, images torn from magazines, or past work. I like to be able to take a step back and look at the big picture. I get into trouble if I start putting things in folders.

 Installation Shot: Meaning Structures, Digital Prints on Vinyl, Sand, print dimensions 5' x 3' , 2014

Installation Shot: Meaning Structures, Digital Prints on Vinyl, Sand, print dimensions 5′ x 3′ , 2014

What unique roles do you see yourself as the artist playing that you may not have envisioned yourself in when you first started making art?

A contemporary artist is essentially a small business owner. This is one of the biggest lessons you get smacked with once you leave school. Obviously the most important thing you can do is spend time developing your craft and enriching your mind conceptually. But in order to make your art sustainable you need to understand some of the basics of marketing, accounting, writing, and a whole lot of administrative organization. Everyone I know who is still making art a couple years out of college can write a charming professional email from their phone while managing an excel sheet.

When do you find is the best time of day to make art? Do you have time set aside every day, every week or do you just work whenever you can? 

For me its early in the morning or late at night. I think you can split up the day into hours you are acting on your own initiative versus hours you are reacting to other people’s needs. Even if your alone it’s something you can feel in the air.I can’t make art if I’m in a reactive mindset. I’m very productive while other people are sleeping and having their morning coffee. But once my inbox starts chiming all hell breaks loose.

Meaning Structures (Blue Structure), Yarn, Jersey, Found Plants, Wire, Dimensions Variable, 2014

Meaning Structures (Blue Structure), Yarn, Jersey, Found Plants, Wire, Dimensions Variable, 2014

How has your work changed in the last five years? How is it the same?

In my experience artists develop in the same way everybody does. They don’t really change; they just become more the way they are. I think that five years ago as a young artist starting out in school I didn’t have the confidence to present the art I wanted to, so I’d always present it from some other angle or gift wrapped in theory. These days I understand what I want to say and have given myself the space and confidence to become more direct and aesthetically eloquent.

Are there people such as family, friends, writers, philosophers or even pop icons that have had an impact on the work you do?

When I’m not paying attention everything has an impact on my work.

If you had an occupation outside of being an artist, what would that be and why?

Comedian. Comedians get to approach emotionally charged existential issues in a seemingly non-threatening way, but can end up really changing people’s outlooks through something beautiful (laughter/aesthetics). I always thought that stand up comedy and visual art where two sides to the same coin. But stand ups get to have a direct relationship with their audience. And they instantly know when something works.

About

headshotBorn In Asuncion Paraguay in 1989. Janina Anderson Attended the Maryland Institute college of art before Graduating with honors from the University of Oregon. Anderson’s work has been shown in galleries, museums, and artist run backyards in Washington DC, Eugene Oregon, Portland Oregon, Los Angeles, and Cádiz Spain.

All images copyright of the artist and used with their permission. 

 

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