Paula Garcia – Santiago, RM, Chile

Landscape-Digital photography printed in cotton embroidered-40x33 cms-2015

Landscape-Digital photography printed in cotton embroidered-40×33 cms-2015

Briefly describe the work you do.

As an artist, I have dedicated my life to photographing ancient customs, religious festivities, and traditional artifacts typical of different cultures. This is done in order to record and preserve the cultural heritage and collective memory of a given place or ethnic group. I believe it is important to value the past in order to better understand the future, the diversity, and the history of the human race.

Afterwards I convert the shots into new images, through the use of various techniques that help me translate, reword, or add information that would not have appeared in the original picture otherwise.

At present I am printing my photos on fabric over which I embroider images and textures. In turn, these added images and textures function as the brush-strokes, sketch lines or focus in a painting and they enhance the original photography by the addition of plastic and tactile elements that give back some of the content lost in the translation from the digital photo to the cloth.

Tell us about your background and how that has had an influence on your work and on you as an artist.

I realize that being an artist was an unconscious decision. When I was little, culture was a very important part in my life: books, history and science were usual topics. During holidays we spent time going to all kinds of museums and historical sights.

Later, when I was studying art, I was sure I would be an engraver, but I got a nasty eye infection. The doctor told my I could not work with chemical or acid for a while, so I started taking photos instead and sending them to the lab to be develop. After that I never stop shooting.

Window-Digital photography printed in cotton embroidered-50x50 cms-2015

Window-Digital photography printed in cotton embroidered-50×50 cms-2015

The concept of the artist studio has a broad range of meanings in contemporary practice. Artists may spend much of their time in the actual studio, or they may spend very little time in it. Tell us about your individual studio practice and how it differs from or is the same as traditional notions of “being in the studio.”

Half of my time I am talking pictures and researching, the other half is working in the studio. The good thing about embroidery is that I can work anywhere: while waiting for the doctor’s appointment, hanging with old friends, etc. So I take a bag with yarns and needles and settle a camp studio!

What roles do you find yourself playing that you may not have envisioned yourself in when you first started making art?

I did not think I would end teaching people about their own culture.

When do you find is the best time to make art? Do you set aside a specific time everyday or do you have to work whenever time allows?

I usually work in art whenever I have time left. I am a photographer, so I divide my time in four main activities:

  1. I take pictures for other companies, like magazines, web design agencies, etc.
  2. I teach photography.
  3. I take photos of intangible heritage.
  4. I do art whenever I am not doing any of the other three things on this list.
The Sisters-Digital photography printed in cotton embroidered-.50x70 cms-2014jpg

The Sisters-Digital photography printed in cotton embroidered-.50×70 cms-2014jpg

How has your work changed in the past five years? How is it the same?

My artwork has change a lot in the last three years. Before that I worked the image as traditional photo, but in 2012 I started embroidering the image, to change and enhance it message. Today I am working translating the photographic image into a code: one pixel, one stitch.

I think, in the other hand, it is the same, because I am still working with the topics I think are important: ecology, everyday life, heritage and culture.

How have people such as family, friends, writers, philosophers, other artists or even pop icons had an impact on the work you do?

I don’t think they know, but my family has had a lot of influence in my work. I have done different pieces inspired in the life, the personalities and decisions of my grandparents and siblings. The last I made was “Still Life” a coral and sea depth crochet series, using the yarn I inherited after my grandmother death.

Have you ever been pulled in the direction of a pursuit other than being an artist? What are your other interests?

Yes, when I was young I used to read and write a lot. For some time I studied to be a biochemist, but I think working with photos and images was stronger than anything else.

About

headshotPaula García was born in Valparaíso, Chile in 1977. She graduated in Fine Arts from Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile in 2001.

Paula has exhibited in Chile and abroad including shows at Iberoamericanos, competition, itinerant exhibition in Bolivia, Paraguay and Perú, and Segunda Muestra Iberoamericana de Arte Miniatura y Pequeño Formato, Centro Cultural Plaza Fátima, Mexico.

She has published several books about cultural heritage.

In 2014, Paula received a award from “Transparentarte” competition, Consejo para la Transparencia (Government sponsored competition) Santiago, Chile. Paula lives and works in Santiago, Chile.

taking-pictures

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All images copyright of the artist and used with their permission.

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EYPRAKSIA – Greece, Athens

Performance 2015

Performance 2015

Briefly describe the work you do.

Basic role for me plays the instinct and the need.From there all begins.From there all are born and evolve .Have the power move and drives everything,from our own lives and by extension the art. Basic role Playing the meaning, symbolism, the deposit,the vision,also the values,values of human life and all that have life, of respect , solidarity and empathy.Art can not fit inside descriptions or  banners, art is based on freedom, the freedom of the artist to express his self and the freedom of the observer to perceive depending on his life experiences and needs  the current art. Βoth are fully respected.Art can save the world because world is art.

Tell us about your background and how that has had an influence on your work and on you as an artist.

In my blood flows a very important civilization  Greek,that was born the spirit,philosophy, the concept of democracy, the arts,health, strong values,.All this heritage exists in my DNA make me feel proud and grateful and shows me my inner road to evolution and  light.

The concept of the artist studio has a broad range of meanings in contemporary practice. Artists may spend much of their time in the actual studio, or they may spend very little time in it. Tell us about your individual studio practice and how it differs from or is the same as traditional notions of “being in the studio

Τhe real studio for me is my own humanity.The place that really arises meaning of creation, becomes the spoliation and the evolution of my art is inside me,my own self.Αll the vibrations, the actions ,gestation within continuity. From then on, I have a place that operates like my own parallel universe like my own black hole from the moment i’ll enter I will get lost in it.

Canvas-Sheers-Acrylic Black-2015

Canvas-Sheers-Acrylic Black-2015

What roles do you find yourself playing that you may not have envisioned yourself in when you first started making art?

I born in the art, so that’s my natural environment . I learned to leave my self in the flow of art, to trust and be born again. Αnything new I trust it, and let  show me the way.

When do you find is the best time to make art? Do you set aside a specific time everyday or do you have to work whenever time allows?

As I mentioned previously, the real studio for me is in my own self, my soul, my spirituality, my vision, there is no specific time of creation,is alive constantly , we are living organisms, continually possessed by feelings, we are emotions Waterfalls you can not set the momentum him. Everything flows and evolves constantly within us.

How has your work changed in the past five years? How is it the same?

I can not isolate it only at he past five years, because Evolution is continuous,in every moment there is the evolution This is the goal  of human.

Canvas-Leafs-Acrylic Black-Glossy Spray 2014

Canvas-Leafs-Acrylic Black-Glossy Spray 2014

How have people such as family, friends, writers, philosophers, other artists or even pop icons had an impact on the work you do?

What characterizes me as an artist is the absolute innerness , I feed my self through the absolute silence.

Have you ever been pulled in the direction of a pursuit other than being an artist? What are your other interests? 

A flower does not ask why blooms, this is the nature of. This is my real nature.

About

01Eypraksia Kontsa was born in Greece. Study music, theater, dance and received education  visual arts.She graduated piano,music theory, Kontrabass, classic song, dance-ballet.Has attended seminars drama, acting, improvisation, mask, physical theater, directing, bioenergy,butho in Greece-Europe and New York. R​​eceived  Education at  Sorbonne in Paris -art history,philosophy, psychology and study the architecture of the burial places of the 19th century.As a visual artist received education structures-including painting-sculpture-video art-sound installations -installations-performance,next to great visual artists in Greece-Europe and New York Has worked as an actress in great performances in Greece and abroad.Directs Theatrical  Visual Performances.As visual artist active in Greece and abroad with exhibitions-festivals-independent art-Art in public space – performance in public space -e.t.

Ηad the Greek participation on Month Of Performance Art in Berlin 2015 also the Greek participation at Short Film Festival of Hamburg-Kinocabaret 2015.

unnamed (7)C

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Maria Antonieta Cortez Cataldo – San Felipe, Quinta región, Chile

"Chile" acrylic paint, varnish, graphite,oil painting. 45 x 110 cm. 2013

“Chile” acrylic paint, varnish, graphite,oil painting. 45 x 110 cm. 2013

Briefly describe the work you do. 

My work consists in the perpetual creation parting from the perception of the real and the unreal, turning it to painting, collage, prints and experimentation mixing various techniques.

Tell us about your background and how that has had an influence on your work and on you as an artist.

Chile is, from a geographic point of view, long, narrow and multicultural. The Near North and the Central Regionof the country have been my life’s scene. I feel an eternal love for the flowering desert (unique in this world) and for the Andes’ mountain rage. These geographical zones, for whatever reason, shaped me since I was a child, and I keep admiring their immense beauty.

The concept of the artist studio has a broad range of meanings in contemporary practice. Artists may spend much of their time in the actual studio, or they may spend very little time in it. Tell us about your individual studio practice and how it differs from or is the same as traditional notions of “being in the studio.”

My working place is “the place where I happen to be”, be it a library, a bus, or my room. Personally, I don’t dispose of a studio where to realize my works. However, that does not put a limit to the hours I dedicate to creating art.

What roles do you find yourself playing that you may not have envisioned yourself in when you first started making art?

For some reason, I’ve always had the intuition of being creating, working on and observing art.

"El cuerpo sufre" collage, graphite, acrylic paint. 60 x 100 cm. 2011

“El cuerpo sufre” collage, graphite, acrylic paint. 60 x 100 cm. 2011

When do you find is the best time to make art? Do you set aside a specific time everyday or do you have to work whenever time allows?

It is always time to create. From day to day, almost like a routine, I assign time for creating, mostly at night. I can pass hours and hours working without feeling the exhaustion which the night brings. 

"Descanso en el placer" drawing on paper and chinese ink. 18 x 12 cm. 2014

“Descanso en el placer” drawing on paper and chinese ink. 18 x 12 cm. 2014

How has your work changed in the past five years? How is it the same?

Five years ago, my work was scattered and focused on investigating sources. Now I can see that my work is consolidated in both visual and conceptual terms. At present I can observe a particular and contemporary imaginary , grown eager through constant learning.

How have people such as family, friends, writers, philosophers, other artists or even pop icons had an impact on the work you do?

Naturally, the family and other close persons have an influence in giving the impulse to having perseverance in working, to continuing one’s way and not to turn away from it. I admire the simplicity of narrative and visual works and the professions that human beings can have when they do not aspire to wealth and recognition. Seeing that, I think it is a way worth following: I am concentrated only in my work, confident that the work itself will talk, travel and cross the world. 

Have you ever been pulled in the direction of a pursuit other than being an artist? What are your other interests? 

In some moment, I studied design. However, time passed by and I felt a necessity for art, I understood that – in spite of its way being vertiginous and sometimes agonizing -art is what makes me happy and which satisfies my soul. My interests also comprehend free education and the revaluation of ancient.

About

11051907_10206036987821621_1472410504212500781_nThe artist was born in 1986 in Chile which at that time respired the military dictatorship. The comet Halley was the year’s protagonist. The artist’s childhood was immersed, marked by her developing an imaginary full of questions and particular curiosities which the family still remembers. At home, there always existed a sewing machine, tools and materials which every day were used for creating and for resolving every-day matters. Nature and the mistakes of human progress were recurrent in the artist’s early observation of what was going on in her country.Generally, arts is considered a subject different from the other subjects which figure in the scholar curriculum. It is considered to be pleasant and less academic than the others. However, when the artist lived in this panorama of artistic education, her curiosity always led her to experiment and create with what was near her.

In her first artwork in college, when she had to made a replica of a contemporary artist’s work and chose Joan Miro and his work “The moon and the bird (La luna y el pájaro)”, she managed to create something distant from the original work but in which in a peculiar way remained its essence. This was the starting point for the artistic production. Later, thanks to academic studies and personal investigation the artist understand, develop and conceptualize in what she names “that the key lies in creating, creating and die creating”.In this way, talent can be developed, polished, smashed and revived.The techniques with and on which she works are painting, printing and mixed techniques; she es about to include screen printing into her visual repertoire.The artist has participated in the National Contest of Young Art in the University of Valparaiso and was selected from over 500 participants.

Her work was published in national newspapers such as “El Ciudadano”, in regional newspapers such as “El Trabajo” and on virtual platforms. A few months ago, “Le Monde Dilpomatique” began to use some of her paintings as illustration for the Chilean edition. The artist’s work has permanated in the underground, but is slowly beginning to be shown in various digital displays and hopefully will find it’s way to a gallery soon.

"Cerros después de la lluvia" xilografia on canvas. 30 x 20 cm. 2010

“Cerros después de la lluvia” xilografia on canvas. 30 x 20 cm. 2010

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Ian Thomas – Slippery Rock, Pennsylvania

Reconciliation, approx. 325 cubic yards of gravel, 2013-2015

Reconciliation, approx. 325 cubic yards of gravel, 2013-2015

Briefly describe the work you do. 

Interdisciplinary.

Tell us about your background and how that has had an influence on your work and on you as an artist.

In 1975, the year before I was born, my grandfather, an industrial arts instructor, willed me a collection of unrelated curiosities. Among these seemingly unrelated objects were tools, measuring devices, and jars full of oddities.

As a child, through play, I would create/construct identities and stories for these bizarre unrelated objects. The older I got, play shifted to questioning, and I searched these groupings for meanings, while trying to understand the disconnected relevance to myself (or, even, my life, or, who I am).

This innocent comparative analysis of visual objects to create a dialogue has been a model for my creative research. A non-linear exploration conflates past and present, while objects of commonplace import are imbued with simultaneity, coupling personal narratives and sociological observations. Metaphoric and anthropocentric, the work sorts my declarations, my attempts at personal and social understanding, and my opinions of the self.

The concept of the artist studio has a broad range of meanings in contemporary practice. Artists may spend much of their time in the actual studio, or they may spend very little time in it. Tell us about your individual studio practice and how it differs from or is the same as traditional notions of “being in the studio.”

My studio practice is fairly traditional. I work in a multitude of locations, my personal studio, school, basement, dinning room, front porch, outdoors or in the gallery itself. Depending on the type of project that I have going on at the time often dictates which of these spaces will be utilized and viewed as “studio”. I view most of my life as “being in the studio” so regardless of the physical space, in someways I am am always in the studio mentally.

Art for the Internet as Viewer Series: Desensitized, archival print, acrylic and graphite on canvas, 38x38inches, 2015

Art for the Internet as Viewer Series: Desensitized, archival print, acrylic and graphite on canvas, 38x38inches, 2015

What roles do you find yourself playing that you may not have envisioned yourself in when you first started making art?

When I was a young maker I would have never realized the paperwork, typing, and administrative activities that surround being an active artist.

When do you find is the best time to make art? Do you set aside a specific time everyday or do you have to work whenever time allows?

After becoming a father I have found that every free moment has potential. I have no set schedule to make, making as much as possible when ever I can. It could be 15 minutes in the morning, 3 hours in the afternoon, or at 2 am. I have found, for my practice, there is no best time to make art, anytime is the best time.

1990's Tragedy Commemorative Series: Columbine, Eric and Dylan, porcelain, slip, 12x26x2inxhes, 2014

1990’s Tragedy Commemorative Series: Columbine, Eric and Dylan, porcelain, slip, 12x26x2inxhes, 2014

How has your work changed in the past five years? How is it the same?

My works have a fairly fast evolutionarily pace and has been this was since I can remember. Whether, good or bad, it is the methodology that holds my attention. My works tend to be diverse from one project to the next, so in this way, my difference in my similitude.

How have people such as family, friends, writers, philosophers, other artists or even pop icons had an impact on the work you do?

In addition to being a visual artists I have been a musician for a couple decades. Collaborating on a visual or conceptual project seem as natural as playing music with another. Ryder Richards, Byron Rich, Shreepad Joglekar are just a few artists that I have had the pleasure to work with. These artists have powerful presence in their own practice. When working with a collaborator it affords and opportunity for personal growth through a collective experience opening paths to ideologies that are not so independently idiosyncratic. These moments of shared making inform and echo within my own practice both on cognitive and subconscious level.

Have you ever been pulled in the direction of a pursuit other than being an artist? What are your other interests?

For a brief time I chased the music dream exclusively, playing and touring for a few years. It was a time that was powerful satisfying but didn’t take off quite as I had hoped. While I still play, it has certainly taken a backseat to the visual arts. My main interests, asides from making, now are my wife and my two children.

About

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAIan F. Thomas is an installation artist who lives in Slippery Rock, PA and works at Allegheny College in Meadville, PA. He holds a BFA from Slippery Rock University and an MFA from Texas Tech University. Thomas received additional training at the Academy of Fine Arts and Design in Bratislava, Slovakia, and The Pottery Workshop in Jingdezhen, China. His works have been shown nationally and internationally.

05_Thomas

ianfthomas.com

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Jaime de la Jara – Madrid, Spain

Pool, Installation, 7,5 x 0,90 x 4 mts, 2015

Pool, Installation, 7,5 x 0,90 x 4 mts, 2015

Briefly describe the work you do. 

It is precisely in the hidden recesses of the picture where my work is displayed. Through a decontextualization of images and objects, fragmented at times, he reveals exactly how far appearances can deceive. Nothing is what it seems.  So what from a distance appears to be a boat, becomes when seen up close a structure made of felt, clearly incompatible with its function: on contact with the water the textile would no longer fulfill its given purpose of remaining afloat on that water.  Like Magritte, I think that all representation is an artifice and he bases himself on the agreed acceptance, and not on the nature of things.  On the contrary, very often the material of the object contradicts the apparent function of the image.

Tell us about your background and how that has had an influence on your work and on you as an artist.

After working about seven years in advertising productions and check the constant use of fiction in this and other means, as lies to find a target, I decided to undertake the task of giving expression to his opinions on the subject. To do this I situated myself within the suggestive and deceitful reality of objects, their narratives and their perception. I realised that the structure of truth and lies arises from beliefs and not from reality: that beliefs are what count, and that if the light from a window is brighter or darker, if it broadens or lengthens or is reduced or attenuated, the reason that explains it must be sought in the conditions and wishes of observation and not in the objects themselves, which are just as we find them or situate them. Mysteries, cadences, incongruities, are projections by the viewer who, if he were situated in other conditions, would produce other views. If we clear away all nostalgic feelings and phantoms regarding the beauty of deceit, with drawings, photos, two-way mirrors, videos, screens, models, sounds, spotlights or structures, the credentials of the current objective are achieved.

Solid, Installation 1, 7 x 3,6 x 3,40 mts, 2014

Solid, Installation 1, 7 x 3,6 x 3,40 mts, 2014

The concept of the artist studio has a broad range of meanings in contemporary practice. Artists may spend much of their time in the actual studio, or they may spend very little time in it. Tell us about your individual studio practice and how it differs from or is the same as traditional notions of “being in the studio.”My studio have two spaces for two different processes. One is for the mental or conceptual process and the other is for the physical process, It is not far from the traditional notions of the artist studio.

But I spend a limited time in the studio, because normally I’m traveling with projects, exhibitions, residences, etc… This forces me to make the most of my time outside and inside the studio, or the others places that I can use like my studio, like hotel rooms or the studio of the residences… Even when I can’t have any space then I have my laptop.

What roles do you find yourself playing that you may not have envisioned yourself in when you first started making art?

When I studied Fine Arts I wanted to be a painter… Now I’m something more complex, I work with different medias, talking with easy words: I’m something like a sculptor but no, I’m an artist, the limits now are broken.

When do you find is the best time to make art? Do you set aside a specific time everyday or do you have to work whenever time allows?

I’m working every time, every time is good for get a good idea. Into the crowds or alone,with family, friends…

Anger Project, Photograph and Installation, 100 x 210 x 90 cm, 2012

Anger Project, Photograph and Installation, 100 x 210 x 90 cm, 2012

How has your work changed in the past five years? How is it the same?

My work is the same, but in a conceptual progress. Experience causes changes in the work and acquire new elements, however my interests are the same like five years ago.

How have people such as family, friends, writers, philosophers, other artists or even pop icons had an impact on the work you do?

Every-thing, like every-person have impact over my work. Because my work talks about us, I’m doing something like a social art, from and for all.

Have you ever been pulled in the direction of a pursuit other than being an artist? What are your other interests? 

No, I’m a full time artist now. I need a lot of time for try to do good works.

About

headshotJaime de la Jara (Madrid, 1972), graduated in Fine Arts at Universidade Complutense de Madrid. Since then has won several prizes and grants, including the: grant of Fundación Marcelino Botín, the prize Creación Artística de la Comunidad de Madrid, the grant Pilar Juncosa Joan Miró / Sothebys, the prize Art Situacions / Honda Transart, the second prize of the Bienal de Fotografía Purificación García, the grant of the artistic residency for Iberoamericanos of FONCA / CONACULTA (Mexican Government) and the Celeste Intentational Art Prize in Rome. More recently, has won the grant of Pollock-Krasner Foundation, of Harriet and Esteban Vicente Foundation and was, over the last four months of 2014, in residency at the Yaddo Corporation, in NY.

Since graduating has received several invitations to participate in both collective and individual projects and has also produced works for different exhibitions, selections and awards, among them: in the chapel of Museo Patio Herreriano de Valladolid, at the Centro de Arte Tecla Sala de Barcelona. Was also present in the editions of the prize Generaciones de Caja Madrid 2005 y 2006 at the Casa Encendida, with honorary mentions.

Participated in the selection of young artists Destino Futuro – curated by Oliva María – in the rooms of the Botanical Garden of Madrid. Presented an individual project in Loop ’07. Participated in exhibitions with selections of the most representative artists of Spain with the curatorship of Lorena Corral/María Corral and Virginia in the projects Planes Futuros y Ocho cuestiones espacialmente extraordinarias respectivamente.

Was always present in the programming of Galería Fúcares in Madrid with which has collaborated from 2005 to 2011. Having presented there the projects 15 Inches and The Navel. Now is represented by Filomena Soares Gallery from Lisbon, where he did his last solo exhibition, The Skin (2015).

His work is represented in collections, such as: Museo Patio Herreriano, Fundación Repsol, Fundación Coca-Cola, Fundación Bankia, Fundación Marcelino Botín del Banco Santander, Museo Artium de Arte Contemporáneo del País Vasco, Fundación CAM, CA2M de la Comunidad de Madrid o Vocento.

I_and_studio

jaimedelajara.com

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Chris Ernst – New Brunswick, New Jersey

Oh the Places. . ., Acrylic, 16" x 20", 2015

Oh the Places. . ., Acrylic, 16″ x 20″, 2015

Briefly describe the work you do.

I work largely with acrylic paint and utilize a wide range of colors.  Pop culture is a common theme throughout my work.  Personal abstractions of design touchstones from punk, hip hop and skate culture shape a large portion of my catalog.  Original drawings have been a recent obsession.  My favorite pieces strike a balance somewhere between contemporary and nostalgic.

Tell us about your background and how that has had an influence on your work and on you as an artist.

I was born in Indiana, grew up in Virginia and have lived in Jersey for about fifteen years.  I feel my travels have impacted my artwork in the sense that my influences are far-reaching.  When I was younger I resented having moved so much but I think it has helped me be expansive in my practice.

The concept of the artist studio has a broad range of meanings in contemporary practice. Artists may spend much of their time in the actual studio, or they may spend very little time in it. Tell us about your individual studio practice and how it differs from or is the same as traditional notions of “being in the studio.”

I have a very open studio that I share with my wife Jamie.  When it comes time to do the work there are many times where I am “in the studio” mentally and focused on completing a new piece.  However, a big part of the action that happens in the studio are the conceptual discussions regarding the art I have with Jamie.  She is an excellent curator and I am fortunate for her council.  She hasn’t steered me wrong and some of my favorite pieces make me even happier than normal because I can see how we worked on it together. 

ODB - Snakes, Acrylic on Cassette Tapes, 10" x 12", 2015

ODB – Snakes, Acrylic on Cassette Tapes, 10″ x 12″, 2015

What roles do you find yourself playing that you may not have envisioned yourself in when you first started making art?

One of the roles I least envisioned when I started off was the role of the explainer.  I was just so excited to get my work into galleries at first that I totally didn’t think about the presentation of the work from the perspective of sharing the thinking process behind a piece.  However, over time I have gotten more comfortable as the explainer and I have had some great conversations with people that have furthered my art.

When do you find is the best time to make art? Do you set aside a specific time everyday or do you have to work whenever time allows?

My two favorite times to work are right around dusk when I am home from work or getting up super early on a weekend morning.  I work to deadlines, whether it is for a juried show with a formal deadline or an informal deadline I have created for myself.  As a result, my efforts in the studio may ramp up and I look to a weekend morning for a killer session or spend a little longer at night during the week.

Tongue Tied, Acrylic, 40" x 30", 2014

Tongue Tied, Acrylic, 40″ x 30″, 2014

How has your work changed in the past five years? How is it the same?

I think my level of detail has advanced, my colors have gotten increasingly bright and neon and my lines have improved significantly.  Original drawings have influenced a larger number of my paintings over the past five years.  Within the past year I have begun using acrylic markers for the black lines in my paintings and I am not sure I will ever go back to brushes for my lines again.  Despite these changes I am still mining some of the same pop culture themes I have always explored.

How have people such as family, friends, writers, philosophers, other artists or even pop icons had an impact on the work you do?

Jamie is my best confidant.  My mom has been my biggest fan throughout the years but really my whole family has been supportive.  It takes a village to raise an artist, I am fortunate to have such a great village.  My grandfathers were both craftsmen and early influences.  Roy Lichtenstein is probably my biggest technical influence but Andy Warhol is a conceptual inspiration as well.    

Have you ever been pulled in the direction of a pursuit other than being an artist? What are your other interests? 

Yes, I am currently in advertising and have my MBA.  I enjoy the work and I think it blends naturally with my art background.  I am a huge music fan and always looking for new tunes.  Fall is my favorite time of year.  I am an avid runner and enjoy snowboarding and surfing. 

About

ChrisErnstStudioChris Ernst is a largely self-taught pop artist from New Brunswick, NJ.  He lives and develops his art with his wife Jamie.  He loves the Blue Ridge Mountains and the Jersey Shore.  Sometimes he feels more like a kid at Halloween than at Christmas.  He loves trip hop and he’ll never say no to good southern comfort food.

ChrisErnstStudio1

instagram.com/cernstart

All images copyright of the artist and used with their permission. 

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Carlos Colín – Vancouver, BC, Canada

No Lugar (No Place). 8" x 20". Neon Light. 2014

No Lugar (No Place). 8″ x 20″. Neon Light. 2014

Briefly describe the work you do.

Art is an indivisible part of the people, and as an art worker, I must participate in my social communities. My works are conceptually based and socially engaged. I work with different materials as needed such as wasted wood, embroidery, photography, and text.

Tell us about your background and how that has had an influence on your work and on you as an artist.

As a Mexican artist, I consider that Latin America has a very particular vision of the world (history, politics, cultural activity, religion, etc.), and how there exists a conceptual variation to produce art, to live, to believe, and to survive as a community. I have an undergraduate diploma in graphic design and visual communication, two Masters degrees in visual arts, one in Mexico City and the second one in Vancouver. I am now studying a PhD in Interdisciplinary Studies, and I consider that the influence of all of these different approaches to creation has formed how I can connect with people through art.

The concept of the artist studio has a broad range of meanings in contemporary practice. Artists may spend much of their time in the actual studio, or they may spend very little time in it. Tell us about your individual studio practice and how it differs from or is the same as traditional notions of “being in the studio.”

I work at home most of the time. My family is there and I love that. It keeps me in perfect balance between life and work. I think the studio creates a distance between you and your surroundings. I am not against art studios and I even used to have one. My “studio” is being with my family, sharing a coffee with friends, walking in the street, and observing situations taking place around me and, of course, sitting down and working on projects, mostly at my kitchen table.

Máscara 010. Photography. 31 1/2" x 47". 2014

Máscara 010. Photography. 31 1/2″ x 47″. 2014

What roles do you find yourself playing that you may not have envisioned yourself in when you first started making art?

I consider art practice as a job, and artists as workers. Artists as workers and part of a society, have the same responsibilities than other workers, with the understanding that workers are people that contribute to society in a collective synergy with their work.

When do you find is the best time to make art? Do you set aside a specific time everyday or do you have to work whenever time allows?

It depends on the day and the project. Sometimes it’s better if I work in the mornings or evenings. The most part of the time I work at night. Most of my life I’ve been working at night because in Mexico City I used to live far from the Zocalo (downtown) and cultural activities, and when I got back home it was always late and I would spend my time working. Working at night has become a sort of habit.

Latinoamérica Unida. Patch. 3". 2013

Latinoamérica Unida. Patch. 3″. 2013

How has your work changed in the past five years? How is it the same?

I have four years living in Vancouver, BC, Canada, and living in the diaspora changed my perspectives and notions about what kind of art I really want to do. Living outside of Mexico reinforced my ideologies, theories, and art production. As a Mexican, and Latin American person I became more conscious of all this knowledge and background I have within me and this has made me understand and explore the idea of living, working, and producing art and theory through the diaspora.

How have people such as family, friends, writers, philosophers, other artists or even pop icons had an impact on the work you do?

Lots of people had an impact on the work I do and my life, but mostly my family. I come from a very close and united family, with all of our problems and charms. The connection between my family and society as a whole has marked me as a person and artist. I try to be aware about what happens everyday in my country and how Mexican society (including my family) goes through all the events in my country. I think family, as the closest people in my life, are the most relevant in terms of how they impact my worldview and work. And now, having my own family, my wife, who is a filmmaker and artist, and our son, have become part of this network of closest persons that impact me everyday.

Have you ever been pulled in the direction of a pursuit other than being an artist? What are your other interests?

My undergraduate diploma is in graphic design and visual communication, and I thought that graphic design would be the direction that I was going to pursue. I began to interrogate the ethics, human behaviour, and the nature of products that you create for mass consumption and for commercial purposes, which led me to visual arts. Being an artist was my other interest, and graphic design was the first step that pulled me into the direction of artist.

About

Headshot - Carlos ColinCarlos Colín was born in Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico in 1980. He grew up in Mexico City. He studied Visual Communication and Design (2000-2004), and a Master’s of Fine Arts at the National School of Fine Art (UNAM) (2009-2011), in Mexico City. He recently completed a second Master’s of Fine Arts at the University of British Columbia (UBC) in Vancouver, BC (2011-2013), and is now pursuing a PhD in Interdisciplinary Studies. His research consists in investigating how contemporary art, artists, and art institutions are involved in current social movements and, by extension, how art contributes to social change and social activism in Latin America. As a Latin American artist, Carlos Colín brings perspectives on the discourse of how art evolves inside societies, how it finds expressions, and how art changes over time, as well as the implications this has for Latin America. Colín is represented by Fazakas Gallery in Vancouver. He participated at the LAB in the Art Gallery of Greater Victoria in 2015; Vancouver Art Gallery Auction, and ArtToronto Art Fair in 2014; Satellite Gallery and Back Gallery Project in Vancouver, BC in 2013; Biennial of Painting Rufino Tamayo in Mexico City in 2011; International Festival of Contemporary Art in Guanajuato, Mexico in 2008; and the Art Biennial of Glass, Museum of Glass, Monterrey, Nuevo León, Mexico in 2008 and 2004.

Favorite place - Colin

carloscolin.mx

All images copyright of the artist and used with their permission. 

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