Katrina Neumann – New York, New York

Untitled,Digitalphotocollageonvellum,24x19in.,2014

Untitled,Digitalphotocollageonvellum,24x19in.,2014

Briefly describe the work you do.

I work on many projects at once that revolve around the ideas of new romanticism, slowness, wanderlust, cartography, and a political call to the return of yesterday’s pastimes for the preservation of today’s environment.I have both a studio and post-studio practice. In the studio, I make photo collages on vellum and wood panels and I secretly make tiny landscape paintings. While creating small-scale works, I dream of doing large-scale installations with these projects one day.In my post-studio practice, I invite people to participate in adventures like extremely long walks in New York City that feel like climbing a mountain, or tours that invite people to come back to nature by viewing a sunrise for just a moment.

Tell us a little about your background and how that influences you as an artist.

While growing up, I was involved in a lot of artistic activities outside of the visual arts. I worked extensively in the theatre department and I played flute competitively.Upon entering university age, I decided to major in theatre at a reclusive liberal arts college in the Pennsylvania Mountains. I soon grew self-conscious during my second year about being a ‘triple threat’ in the theatre world; so, I changed my major to art and began pursuing graphic design. Simultaneously, I took a painting course and remember one night stating, “If I could do this the rest of my life, I would.” My professor, Melissa Kuntz, soon encouraged me to apply to art schools where I had since graduated with a B.F.A. from Purchase College, lived in Flux Factory (II) in Long Island City, and received my M.F.A. from SMFA and Tufts University amongst other highlights in my emerging career.Today, I still take my theatre, graphic design, and musical background into consideration as tools for projects that I have worked on and projects to come.

PriBlan,Multimediatemporalinstallationanddurational performance (performance in collaboration with Fabiola Menchelli) including: Drywall, wallpaper, screws, paint, sledge hammers, drill, wood, double .jpg projection on 1 min. loop, 300 sq. ft, 2011

PriBlan,Multimediatemporalinstallationanddurational performance (performance in collaboration with Fabiola Menchelli) including: Drywall, wallpaper, screws, paint, sledge hammers, drill, wood, double .jpg projection on 1 min. loop, 300 sq. ft, 2011

The concept of the “artist studio” has a broad range of meanings, especially in contemporary practice. The idea of the artist toiling away alone in a room may not necessarily reflect what many artists do from day to day anymore. Describe your studio practice and how it differs from (or is the same as) traditional notions of ‘being in the studio.’

I jump back and forth between being in the studio and having a post- studio practice. This comes from attending two schools of thought, both Purchase College (studio-based) and SMFA (post-studio based). A majority of my work happens outside of my studio. However, I do crave making tangible objects and the satisfaction of seeing a product that long-term conceptual projects can’t immediately satisfy for me.

What unique roles do you see yourself as the artist playing that you may not have envisioned yourself in when you first started making art?
When I began, I never saw myself as being able to break down the walls of my studio to involve more community-based projects. Also, I didn’t foresee including social elements such as collaborative projects to performative works – and thank goodness for this because it can get lonely in the studio.On another note, I never saw myself as an activist and an artist and being able to co-mingle the two. Today, I see my interest in Disaster Relief Volunteering and being an artist inseparable. I enjoy the research aspect of this practice and the ability to be ‘in the field’ as a documentarian of epic catastrophe and a helping hand.
DerSonnenaufgangTours(afterFriedrich)LongIslandCity,Social Practice including: catered breakfast, coffee or tea in metal canisters, 2-3 participants, an un-theatrical tour to an unspecified but pre-determined location, picnic blanket (at times chairs or folding table provided), no cellphones or cameras are allowed, 2-3 hours, 2013

DerSonnenaufgangTours(afterFriedrich)LongIslandCity,Social Practice including: catered breakfast, coffee or tea in metal canisters, 2-3 participants, an un-theatrical tour to an unspecified but pre-determined location, picnic blanket (at times chairs or folding table provided), no cellphones or cameras are allowed, 2-3 hours, 2013

When do you find is the best time of day to make art? Do you have time set aside every day, every week or do you just work whenever you can?

I try to be good about budgeting my time, though it gets tricky because I have a full-time job as a designer in a gallery in Chelsea and I run a website. But I make sure that I have one full day a week in the studio and try to squeeze the sleepy hours after work in as studio time. I write in the mornings and begin working in the afternoon – sometimes my work outside of the studio happens in the wee hours of 4:30 am to 10:00 am.
How has your work changed in the last five years? How is it the same?
I think my artwork within the last five years has undergone a huge reconstruction . . . but, maybe later down the line, I will see the connection that lead me to where I am in the future.In 2009, I was a purist painter living in Flux Factory and I had a studio in 5-Pointz (when artists could afford studios in NYC). I didn’t get Flux Factory when I lived there at the time. I would think things like, ‘why would you build a Shanty Town (by Ian Montgomery) on the rooftop?!’ but at the same time I was extremely mesmerized by these works. I began wanting more than the limits of the stretcher bars; my ideas felt bigger than a 2-Dimensional still image.Today, like all ex-painters will say, I feel like I still have the inner core and heart of a painter and most of my work is inspired by images in historical and contemporary paintings.
Are there people such as family, friends, writers, philosophers or even pop icons that have had an impact on the work you do?

Current Artists: Bas Jan Ader, Caspar David Friedrich, Sophie Calle, and Alejandro Jodorowsky

Family: All of them from the republican-gun-loving-southern ladies and gents to my British-tea-drinking-sassy-loving grandmother and my ever-supportive mother and father.Friends: They are all muses in so many ways – whether chosen artists or not – from every laugh and conversation, my life is enlightenedProfessors: Jeannie, Mary-Ellen, Barbara, Katharina, Nancy, Bobby

B, Dannielle, Melissa, Patte, Kaersten, Cathie, George, Magda, & KateCurrent book of influence: Wilderness and the American Mind by Roderick Nash, How to Use Your Eyes by James Elkins, & Wanderlust by Rebecca SolnitDreams: My reoccurring dreams about the apocalypse, which often look like environmental disaster sites.

If you had an occupation outside of being an artist, what would that be and why?

Fo’gedaboutit! I work too hard to be an artist in the moonlight hours to think about being anything else . . . maybe a professor, with a lush studio in New York and many research grants to practice my art . . . or, an artist represented by a blue-chip gallery (hello, museum collections!) – but this is all in the world and range of an artist.

About

KNeumann_HeadshotBorn in 1985 outside of Los Angeles and grew up in the suburbs of Washington D.C., Katrina Neumann works internationally as a visual artist. She received her B.F.A from SUNY at Purchase College and her M.F.A from Tufts University/School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Her work has been featured in the juried-in-print exhibition New American Paintings, Radio Context, WNYC, Whurk Magazine and Berlin Art-Parasites. She is affiliated with Flux Factory, Elsewhere Museum, CAC Woodside, LMCC, Creative Capital, Artist Alliance Inc. and All Hands Volunteer.

Neumann is the Founder and Chief Editor of Rate My Artist Residency. This growing resource provides a platform for artists to socially and critically engage in conversations about artist residencies worldwide. The website has been featured in ArtFCity, BlouinArtInfo, Artspace, China Residencies, CMagazine, and NYArts Magazine.

Katrina currently lives and works in New York City. Her upcoming projects include a collaboration with a string quartet (Rose Hashimoto, Karen Dekker, James Waldo, and Beth Wenstrom), a residency with Artists Alliance Inc. and a forthcoming exhibition with Cuchifritos Gallery and Project Space.

KNeumann_Studio

www.katrinaneumann.com

All images copyright of the artist and used with their permission.

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Eugenia Pardue – Portland, Oregon

"Tableaux #8", 12" x 12", Hand sculpted Acrylic Polymer, 2014

“Tableaux #8″, 12″ x 12″, Hand sculpted Acrylic Polymer, 2014

Briefly describe the work you do.

I hand sculpt white on white acrylic polymer.A paean to nature, I translate the luxuriance, sensuality and fecundity found in flora and the ornamental.  In an artist residency in the Czech Republic, I lived and painted in an 18th Century palace—an immersion in the splendors of the baroque and rococo, which impressed upon me the ties between the decorative arts and the narrative, myth-making power of contemporary abstract painting.  They are pure, meditative, and sacred, painterly and sculptural, minimalist and maximalist, serene and dramatic, with undertones of danger and seduction.  I aim to bring viewers back into touch with the opulent physicality of art, and to remind them of the beauty within themselves.

Tell us a little about your background and how that influences you as an artist.

In my painting there is a sense of luxury, rooted in the luxuriance of nature.  As a child I frolicked in nature, camping in the forests, swimming in Santa Cruz, and running around my family’s 80-acre farm in Minnesota. I spent my early adult years in New Orleans and Miami, sultry sub-tropical cities with spicy cuisine and brilliant colors.  But not until I lived in Portland, Oregon, with its gorgeous gardens lining the avenues, did I begin to translate nature’s sensuality and fecundity into my art. 

The concept of the “artist studio” has a broad range of meanings, especially in contemporary practice. The idea of the artist toiling away alone in a room may not necessarily reflect what many artists do from day to day anymore. Describe your studio practice and how it differs from (or is the same as) traditional notions of “being in the studio.”

I consider my whole life being a studio practice. Yes, I “toil away alone” but I also am engaged in life, traveling, having rich conversations with other artists and people from all walks of life. I live, breath and am an artist. This is my life and this what defines me, this is how I live.

"Cascading Coronal"  48"x40", Hand sculpted Acrylic Polymer, 2014

“Cascading Coronal” 48″x40″, Hand sculpted Acrylic Polymer, 2014

What unique roles do you see yourself as the artist playing that you may not have envisioned yourself in when you first started making art?

I am constantly challenging my self to develop new dialogue in the concept of paint as visceral medium. I ground myself in the process and materials. Each piece elicits a visceral reaction while making associations with the natural world of flora and fauna.  My language is about beauty and is both visual and descriptive. My art reflects upon the past of Baroque elegance where design evoked the majesty of nature and these elements were metaphors for the human condition.  I combine symbolism and innovation of the medium of paint to speak to a new dialog in painting. 

When do you find is the best time of day to make art? Do you have time set aside every day, every week or do you just work whenever you can?

 My best time of day to work is to start mid morning after I have done my daily routine of taking care of my pets, doing a daily practice of yoga. I work every day 5-6 days a week any where from 5 hours to the wee hours in the morning. When i am in the “making”, I get lost, and time escapes me and before I know it, is 4am!

"Tableaux #11", 12" x 12", Hand sculpted Acrylic Polymer, 2014

“Tableaux #11″, 12″ x 12″, Hand sculpted Acrylic Polymer, 2014

How has your work changed in the last five years? How is it the same?

I have been working white on white since 2005. My strength is in color theory, but the work I do begs to be in white.

Right now, I am in the process of transitioning from the highly decorative forms, introducing a bit color while still focusing on the opulent, sublime, and subtlety of cascading light and how it reflects on the surface.

Are there people such as family, friends, writers, philosophers or even pop icons that have had an impact on the work you do?

Family: My twin sister, Allison. My husband Sam. My pets, Amelia, Count Zero and Betty. Friends: Richard Speer (my dear friend and art critic and amazing writer).Kelly Kerwick, Abi Spring, Dana Lynn Louis, Karen Silve, (all dear friends and amazing artists). Writers: (Just to name a few). Again:Richard Speer (my dear friend and art critic and amazing writer). Dave Hickey: “The Invisible Dragon: Essays on Beauty”, Beau Monde: Toward a Redeemed Comopolitanism. “Odd Nerdrum:  Kitsch, More than Art” by Jan-Ove Tuv (Author), Bjorn Li (Author), Dag Solhjell (Author), Odd Nerdrum (Artist). Camille Paglia, “Sexual personae: Art and Decadence fron Nefertiti to Emily Dickinson”. And “Glittering Images: A Journey Through Art from Egypt to Star Wars”. Virgina Wolf “A Room of One’s Own”.

About

Eugenia PardueA professional artist for over twenty years, Eugenia Pardue has showed her work internationally and been collected by numerous corporations and individuals. Her exhibition career includes dozens of solo and group exhibitions. In 2012 Eugenia was awarded “Grand Prize” in the Center on Contemporary Art Northwest Annual in Seattle, WA, an exhibition of comprehensive survey of the top tier of Northwest Artists. She has commissioned works in the Presidential Suite in the Nines Hotel, Portland OR, Tiffany’s & Co., The Ritz-Carlton Tyson Center in Washington DC. Her work has been reviewed in numerous local and national and international publications.

From an early age, Eugenia Pardue enjoyed the richness of engaging with tactile elements, as she experimented with painting, drawing and clay. When Pardue enrolled in a ceramics class at Florida International University, Miami her artistic career took focus. She majored in painting and was awarded her Masters of Fine Arts in 1990. 

In 2003, Pardue eliminated oils from her stable and embraced gallons of acrylic medium.  She chose to confront the contemporary dilemma of paintings where art became about the non-painting. Pardue decided to address this point of view head on by showcasing the versatility and complexity of painting as a subject in and of itself.

In 2006, Pardue participated in the “Milkwood Artist Residency” in Cesky Krumlov, Czech Republic.  Here she developed her work as seen today where she paints in white while applying decorative motifs and architectural elements. There is a luscious tension of the forms that allows the viewer to move inside and outside the composition. Her works take on the feminine quality of organic shapes while using a medium that is completely fluid.  Shadow and shape are the subjects. 

Pardue grounds herself in the process and materials. Each piece elicits a visceral reaction while making associations with the natural world of flora and fauna.  Her language is about beauty and is both visual and descriptive. Her art reflects upon the past of Baroque elegance where design evoked the majesty of nature and these elements were metaphors for the human condition.  Pardue combines symbolism and innovation of the medium of paint to speak to a new dialog in painting.

In the Studio

The Studio

www.eugeniapardue.com

All images copyright of the artist and used with their permission.

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Bradley Tsalyuk – Los Angeles, California

Weslo Pursuit E25 2013 8’x4’x4’ Perpetually running stationary bike, custom printed banner, corian countertop samples Collaborative installation with Corey Dunlap.

Weslo Pursuit E25
2013
8’x4’x4’
Perpetually running stationary bike, custom printed banner, corian countertop samples
Collaborative installation with Corey Dunlap.

Briefly describe the work you do.

My work is led by an insatiable curiosity, irrational collecting, and theft that has evolved as I’ve continued making. I often agitate my ideas through a variety of mediums, like a taste test in search of a sublime formula. I’m always searching for that self-stimulated gasp. I’m captivated by facets of contemporary culture that have created languages for themselves, speak to historical lineages, and generate objects and actions to be appropriated. Because of this fascination I have recently generated work using pilfered material related to Doomsday Preppers, self help culture, and the search for extraterrestrial intelligence. I also work collaboratively with my partner, Corey Dunlap. This collaborative work has allowed for larger pieces and a collision of our interests.

Tell us a little about your background and how that influences you as an artist.

My parents were immigrants from the former Soviet Union. Because of them I appreciate not only my education but also the freedom to learn about anything and everything. I have always been interested in science. It’s a broad umbrella that includes social sciences, life sciences, applied sciences, etc. In these realms there is always a search for something beyond our understanding. That desire to search has always stayed with me.

The concept of the “artist studio” has a broad range of meanings, especially in contemporary practice. The idea of the artist toiling away alone in a room may not necessarily reflect what many artists do from day to day anymore. Describe your studio practice and how it differs from (or is the same as) traditional notions of “being in the studio.”

I have a traditional studio space but since I work with my partner and we share that space, I tend to not be toiling away alone in a room. I like the idea of a collaborative studio space whether I’m in a room collaborating with my partner or outside collaborating with the environment around me.

Moon Orbit 2014 Performance with moon globe.

Moon Orbit
2014
Performance with moon globe.

What unique roles do you see yourself as the artist playing that you may not have envisioned yourself in when you first started making art?

I never thought that I would become a collector on the verge of hoarder. I recently did a big cross-country move and was forced to reevaluate the things I’ve amassed. My collecting also extends beyond physical objects into the digital realm. I’ve been building a digital library of essays, books, and articles along side photo documentation of work. Maybe my next role will be as an archivist and I will tackle some of the physical or digital piles. 

When do you find is the best time of day to make art? Do you have time set aside every day, every week or do you just work whenever you can? 

I work whenever I can. I utilize weekends for more labor intensive or time consuming projects. Having my partner in the studio pushes me to work more. We tend to be in the studio together. 

How has your work changed in the last five years? How is it the same?

I graduated from my undergrad recently (is 1 year ago considered recent?) so most of the shifts in my work are as a direct result of my experience at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts-Boston. My work has shifted away from any kind of commitment to a particular medium. I’ve incorporated more found materials and text over the years. I still incorporate play, satire, irony, and DIY elements into my current work. The evolution of my collaborative efforts has also made me more ambitious.

Moon Orbit 2 2014 Performance with moon globe.

Moon Orbit 2
2014
Performance with moon globe.

Are there people such as family, friends, writers, philosophers or even pop icons that have had an impact on the work you do? 

I feel like there are to many artists, writers, and filmmakers that have impacted my work. My more immediate influences are my family, friends, and my partner. My friends and community from school are some of the most intelligent and diverse people I’ve met. Their different backgrounds and interests always make me reconsider the way I look at my own work. My partner, who is also an artist, has become increasingly important as I try to grow my practice and move forward as a creative professional. He is someone who doesn’t let me get away with making bullshit work and definitely helps me follow through on projects I might otherwise doubt.

If you had an occupation outside of being an artist, what would that be and why?

It’s hard to imagine doing anything else. If anything I think I would be a professional tinkerer. Someone who takes things apart, fixes them, and puts them back together.

About

Headshot Bradley TsalyukBradley Tsalyuk is a graduate of the School of the Museum of Fine Arts-Boston. He has shown throughout the United States including the 2013 CAA conference in New York City, an exhibition of touchable artwork at Public Space One in Iowa City, and the 2013 Rapid Pulse International Performance Art Festival in Chicago. He has contributed to multiple visual art publications including The Emergency Index, an annual collection of performance art documentation. Bradley Tsalyuk lives and works in Los Angeles, CA. 

In the Studio

In the Studio

www.cargocollective.com/tsalyuk

All images copyright of the artist and used with their permission.

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Daisy Patton – Denver, Colorado

Untitled (Novak), Mixed Media Painting, 18”x24”,  2014

Untitled (Novak), Mixed Media Painting, 18”x24”, 2014

Briefly describe the work you do.

My practice is deeply entrenched in history and memory, and I work in a variety of media investigating those interests. I prefer exploring the social conventions and meaning of families, our relationships to the photograph and its inherent emotional ties, and what it is to be a person living in our contemporary world. Additionally, the connection between painting and photography is something I return to regularly, and I have two series exploring that right now. One is enlarging found/abandoned family photos and painting over them in an examination of memory and identity, and the other is realistically painting family photos of mine and my potential father’s (who I’ve never met) as a way to create an alternate, fake timeline of his presence. Generally, my work is emotionally charged and hopefully evokes a response from the audience; moreover, it’s often research-heavy and long-term. I also love connecting with others in not so serious projects, like the illustration blog I have where I draw colloquial Venezuelan sayings and collect this cultural ephemera.

Tell us a little about your background and how that influences you as an artist.

My somewhat difficult childhood has greatly affected who I am as an artist. I’ve always been interested in storytelling and making up reasons for why people behaved the way they did, or perhaps what happened in the past. Growing up in a single parent household with no knowledge of who my father was, the missing information of my heritage (my father was supposedly Iranian) meant that, subconsciously, I redirected that curiosity to everything that was around me. I read voraciously, anything from history books about far away countries, detective tales, and most especially ghost stories and colloquial mythology. In the film The Devil’s Backbone, a character talks about how ghosts are repeated events in time, which I think perfectly describes how these seemingly disparate interests tie together. Also, my family was very poor economically and health-wise, and that constant instability I think really influenced my attempts to regain some semblance of control through my art-making.

It has been really in the last five years that I’ve understood just how much that upbringing shaped my art and my commitment to social justice; I’ve been focusing more and more on powerlessness and helplessness and trying to make some kind of impact on my local community in one way or another. Another thing that factors into my work as an artist is my health; I was diagnosed with Multiple Sclerosis four years ago. It means that the very act of making, of what I can do, or even my focus has changed. The illness does not define who I am (no MS sufferer first, person second crap), but it may factor into why I’m so attracted to some kind of lack or powerlessness. Likewise, this means that I’m working as hard as I can for as long as I physically am able to do so.

Christmas Presents, Oil on Panel, 10”x10”, 2013

Christmas Presents, Oil on Panel, 10”x10”, 2013

The concept of the “artist studio” has a broad range of meanings, especially in contemporary practice. The idea of the artist toiling away alone in a room may not necessarily reflect what many artists do from day to day anymore. Describe your studio practice and how it differs from (or is the same as) traditional notions of “being in the studio.”

Until recently, I’d worked from home, trying to navigate the restriction to small spaces and not destroy the apartments I’d lived in. That really resulted in a great deal of isolation, both because I wasn’t surrounded by other artists in a general studio space and because my late hours meant studio visits were hard to schedule. I’m incredibly fortunate and excited to be a new resident artist at RedLine Denver, a fantastic art organization that has artist studios that are open to the public. So while before I worked alone and with little to no interaction, now I have members of the public wander into my studio while I’m working to chat about art, what I’m up to, or anything in between! It’s been a wonderful experience so far, and I’ve found the open door studio concept to be invigorating and prompts me to work even more. I know many artists would find that distracting or balk at showing their process at work, but I actually welcome having those interactions. I deeply believe that art should be meaningful to more than just an elite few, and I enjoy being able to increase arts literacy with the general public by having these conversations or even just letting them have a peek at what I’m doing.

Untitled (Mary Ann Hollingsworth to Nancy), Mixed Media Painting, 20”x20”, 2014

Untitled (Mary Ann Hollingsworth to Nancy), Mixed Media Painting, 20”x20”, 2014

What unique roles do you see yourself as the artist playing that you may not have envisioned yourself in when you first started making art?

This is something I frequently think about now: what is the role of art and the artist in society? I like to think that art is an interpretation of our surroundings and contemporary life and the artist is the mediator of this interpretation. When I was younger, my impulse was to create and make work, but I didn’t really understand the larger role of artists as cultural mediators until a few years ago. I like to imagine that artists can bridge various worlds and topics with their work, and that’s something that dawned on me as I matured as an artist.

When do you find is the best time of day to make art? Do you have time set aside every day, every week or do you just work whenever you can? 

 I am a total night owl, which can be a problem since working 9pm to 3am doesn’t vibe well with others’ schedules! But night is always best, or at the very least, late afternoon at the earliest. Since I’ve had my public studio at Redline, I’ve been trying to track back my working time to be present during business hours, but truthfully, I’m still trying to sort that out. In my mind, art-making is a job, and I am in studio six out of seven days of the week consistently. Even if it’s just to think about a potential piece or clean up, I need to be there and I need to be making something.

How has your work changed in the last five years? How is it the same?

Five years ago, I was doing voyeuristic street photography almost exclusively, and now I’m back into painting, something I’d done for most of my life except that period of time. I also have a sound art project, digital media work, a graphic novel I’m working on…so in the most basic sense, the media I use has exploded and the number of on-going projects I have has as well. Additionally, I’ve gotten more comfortable doing work that is more personal or autobiographical, something I hated until around three years ago. But there are common threads throughout these bodies of work that remain: examining relationships between people and our environment, as well as that voyeurism and construction of false relationships.

Are there people such as family, friends, writers, philosophers or even pop icons that have had an impact on the work you do?

Whew, that’s hard to answer because I find inspiration everywhere! I certainly adore the writing of Rebecca Solnit, whose work on history, landscape, politics, gender, philosophy, and so much more is a great reflection of what’s rattling in my brain in a given moment. I tend to read extensively in certain fields: history, true crime in history, life science/behavioral science, human arrogance in nature, and memory-based work, which all inevitably feeds into my thought-process and practice. Having supporting friends and my best friend, my husband Henry, help keep me working when doubt or irritations could derail me. But really, looking at art, other artists, and thinking about the relationship between those and our society is what motivates me most. I adore the work of Marlene Dumas, Sophie Calle, Ellen Gallagher, Nan Goldin, Tracey Emin, Doris Salcedo, who I consider influences in varying ways—and specifically, I’m very much drawn to women and women’s work/experiences historically, within the art world, and now.

If you had an occupation outside of being an artist, what would that be and why?

Part of the joy of being an artist is that you can be a dilettante in a variety of fields, which makes the polymath in me very happy. That said, while I’ve always been an artist, I did consider being a history professor as a day job for a long time. If I had to, I’d fall back on that path since there’s something really attractive about understanding and unraveling events in the past.

 About

Patton_HeadshotOriginally from Los Angeles, California, Daisy Patton moved back and forth between Oklahoma and California for most of her childhood. She has a BFA in Studio Arts from the University of Oklahoma with minors in History and Art History and an Honors degree. Her MFA is from The School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston/Tufts University, a multi-disciplinary program. Patton received the Montague Travel Grant to do research in Dresden, Germany for an upcoming project, and she was also awarded a position as an exchange student at the University of Hertfordshire, UK while an undergraduate. She has been granted residencies at the Anythink Libraries in Colorado and most recently a two-year residency at RedLine, an arts organization in Denver, Colorado. Exhibiting in group and solo shows nationally, she is represented by Michael Warren Contemporary in Denver with an upcoming show in December. Patton resides in Denver, a happy distance away from bears.

The Studio

The Studio

daisypatton.com

All images copyright of the artist and used with their permission.

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Emily Glass – Rochester, New York

 The Curious State, Charcoal on Paper, 68 by 36 in, 2012

The Curious State, Charcoal on Paper, 68 by 36 in, 2012

Briefly describe the work you do.

I mainly identify as a painter, but my work ranges in materials from traditional and water-soluble oil paint, to ink, oil and chalk pastels, to graphite and charcoal. I generally work on paper or canvas. The content of my work focuses on social and individual states of being and the subjects of my work are often biological in nature. I feel I am hard pressed to find forms that are more structurally complex and visually stunning than natural living forms. I delight in studying their complexity and teasing out my associations with pedestrian life that I find in groupings of insects, livestock and plants.

Tell us a little about your background and how that influences you as an artist.

I spent a large part of my youth growing up outside on 9.75 acres of forest and hobby farm land in Vermont. I made a choice early on to not watch TV, which created a sizable gap in my knowledge of pop culture. This however did free up a large part of my time to explore and exist outside. Time to sit and listen, time to build, to reflect, to observe, to read, and to learn from and train the horses and house pets. I studied the results of my experimental vegetable garden. I watched as my carefully hypothesized ideas on best horticultural practice either grew or failed. I would eagerly take notes and collect seeds, often pumpkin, and try again. The main interest was in learning every intricacy of the plant or animal’s growth and life.Within my paintings these tracts of learning, observing and experimenting continue. The paintings and drawings become records of my attempts to truly see and think in depth about the structure and beauty of living organisms. Over time social and cultural observations have become more significant, permeating my mind and inevitably mixing with how I see natural forms. I welcome the complexity and see it as a way to reflect and center myself.

Eggs for Breakfast, Oil, Marker and Pencil on Canvas, 41 by 103 in, 2010

Eggs for Breakfast, Oil, Marker and Pencil on Canvas, 41 by 103 in, 2010

The concept of the “artist studio” has a broad range of meanings, especially in contemporary practice. The idea of the artist toiling away alone in a room may not necessarily reflect what many artists do from day to day anymore. Describe your studio practice and how it differs from (or is the same as) traditional notions of “being in the studio.”

The space I work in varies on whether or not I can bring my canvas and paints to the forms I am painting. For subject material I visit state fairs, herbariums, national parks, entomology museums, biology departments and my immediate back yard, with a sketch book and camera in hand. I have painted in veterinary medicine dissection labs, old football stadium studios and apartment parking lots. Most currently I spend as much time as possible painting outside for the pure necessity of excellent ventilation and light. ‘Being in the studio’ will change again as the seasons move into winter and I search for new subject matter and another place to paint.

What unique roles do you see yourself as the artist playing that you may not have envisioned yourself in when you first started making art?

When I first started making, I knew I could sustain my interest in art but I did not know how I could sustain myself in a career. It was not long, (through the help of some very important mentors,) before I was teaching at a college level and realizing my love for sharing the ability to make. Although teaching is not unique, it was at first a surprise to me, to find comfort standing in front of a group and presenting the next visual challenge to solve. The experience has been rewarding past what I could anticipate. Over the past six years, I have continued to learn from teaching each semester, and this trend endures at Rochester Institute of Technology in NY where I am currently a visiting assistant professor.

When do you find is the best time of day to make art? Do you have time set aside every day, every week or do you just work whenever you can? 

I am a morning person but the best time to paint is all day. A four hour block of painting in the morning. An hour or two for a laid back lunch with a book. Then a four hour block of painting in the afternoon before dinner. I take breaks for a cup of tea as needed and I stretch and dance to keep my blood moving. During the summer I’ll spend as many days like this as possible with gallery/museum/library and exploration trips intermingled. On days when I can’t have a large block of time to paint, I try to make something for at least an hour. Despite how tired I am at the end of the day, if I can put music on and get myself in front of art materials for an hour, my mind is put at ease. All of the fullness of the day can empty out through making. I allow these single studio hours to be completely open with no expectations. Whim takes over and I play and experiment with whatever interests me at the moment. These single hours spent in the studio are incredibly important to my work, my process of thinking through ideas, and my enjoyment of making.

How has your work changed in the last five years? How is it the same? 

Five years ago I was in grad school. I was experimenting with mark and process. I was asking myself how much of the stages of gesture and drawing should appear in the final stage of my paintings. There is something very raw and honest about the first dozen attempts of composition and form that lay underneath a finished painting. While these qualities remain part of my work, the paintings I’m working on now explore a more complete understanding of the objects under study. What has remained the same is my broad focus on natural subjects and social constructs.

Watchers, Oil on Canvas, 36 by 101 in, 2011

Watchers, Oil on Canvas, 36 by 101 in, 2011

Are there people such as family, friends, writers, philosophers or even pop icons that have had an impact on the work you do? 

On a larger scope family, friends, peers and the varied books I pick up do have an impact on my approach to working habits and what I ultimately complete and show. Interactions with engaged thoughtful persons and texts are all part of the intellectual and emotionally supportive energy that helps enrich my thoughts and excites me to make. One specific example that has impacted my process is: Hellen and Scott Nearing’s writings in The Good Life. In part of this book they talk about organizing time with the goal of non-anxious, non-pressured or rushed work time. I have long debated and tested many different weekly self-imposed painting schedules, always questioning how much I can accomplish and whether it is enough. Their strategy is what I base my above described studio practice on and is the only strategy I’ve found that feels balanced and sustainable.

If you had an occupation outside of being an artist, what would that be and why? 

If I had another occupation outside of my current work, I would likely find a way to stay close to the topics of botany or biology, studying specific wild or domesticated species. But I do have an occupation outside of being an artist, which is teaching. It is a big part of my current identity. What I do in the studio gives me energy and content to bring to the classroom, and what I learn from my experiences in the academic studios, I bring back to my work.

About

Emily Glass, Headshot, 2014Emily received her BFA from the State University of New York at Potsdam and her MFA degree in painting from Kansas State University. Emily is currently a Visiting Assistant Professor in the School of Art at Rochester Institute of Technology.Her personal work embraces the investigation of anatomical and structural forms of animals, insects and plants. Large panoramic paintings and small enclosed charcoal and pencil drawings make up the current boundaries of her process. What is at stake within her art is the development of individuals on a two dimensional surface. Some issues explored through this process of inspecting the figure are ideas of self-image, social indifference and social indulgence. Emily’s research leads to the study of cadavers in biology departments, insects in university entomology museums, and most recently biological matter in herbariums and the gardens of her immediate surroundings of Rochester NY.In the last three years Emily’s work has shown in juried and solo exhibitions in New York, Kansas, Arkansas, Iowa, Maryland, Oklahoma and Illinois. Most recently she participated in national juried exhibitions at The Fine Arts Center of Hot Springs Arkansas, the Maryland Federation of Art and the High Falls Museum in NY.

Seasonal Studio Space, 2014

Seasonal Studio Space, 2014

emilyglassart.com

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Andrew Cozzens – Louisville, Kentucky

An Emotive Model of Time Perception Steel, Latex balloon, motion sensor, motor, time 8’x10’x5’ 2011

An Emotive Model of Time Perception
Steel, Latex balloon, motion sensor, motor, time
8’x10’x5’
2011

Briefly describe the work you do.

I aim to create a phenomenological based situation in which the time duration of the exhibited occurrence becomes an experience rather than a measured interval. With an array of materials, I utilize both natural and synthetic processes to give my work a lifespan beyond the instantaneous viewing. By virtue of one’s own sensual impulses, I encourage the viewer to experience the present, develop a past, consider the future, and realize their place within the continuum of the work.

At what point I your life did you want to become an artist?

I feel like the urge to create and learn has always been there, but I didn’t know that I wanted to be a professional artist until high school when I realized you could go to college and pursue it seriously as a career.

Tell us a little about your background and how that influences you as an artist.

I was born and raised in a blue-collar family. I think this is where I get my work ethic. Born into a household where there wasn’t much art exposure growing up, helped me make more authentic work. I believe this gave me a different perspective and made it easier to think outside of the art context and more from a real world perspective.

Drained PVC,  HMA, time 8”x16”x4” 2013

Drained
PVC, HMA, time
8”x16”x4”
2013

What types of conceptual concerns are present in your work? How do those relate to the specific process(es) or media you use?

Time: my concern is the temporality of my artwork, which causes me to use processes that are durational. My work usually has a lifespan.

Simultaneity Steel, Chromite, oscillating motor, time 4”x4”x3” 2013

Simultaneity
Steel, Chromite, oscillating motor, time
4”x4”x3”
2013

We once heard Chuck Close say he did not believe in being inspired, rather in working hard everyday. What motivates you in your studio practice?

I think of every artwork as a stepping-stone. It is how I grow- knowing every work will simply lead me to the next, which I hope will keep me progressing in my research and making.

What artists living or non-living influence your work? 

Ceal Floyer, Francis Alys, Roman Signer, Anne Hamilton, Anish Kapoor, Giuseppe Penone… among many others.

When you are not making art what types of activities and interests do you engage in?

I teach at several universities. I enjoy bowling, traveling and live music. When I’m not working, I volunteer for many arts organizations

About

artist selfAndrew Cozzens (b. 1983) is a Louisville native who received his MFA from Washington University in St. Louis in 2010 after earning his BFA from Murray State University in 2008. He has exhibited his work nationally and internationally at Laumeier Sculpture Park, St. Louis, MO, the Arenes du Lutece, Paris, France, SLOSS Furnaces Historical Gallery, Birmingham, AL, and the Siena Art Institute, Siena, Italy. In 2010 he was the recipient of the Milliken Travel Grant and the Cite’ Internationale Des Arts Residency in Paris, France. He currently lives and works in Louisville, KY.

In the Studio

In the Studio

www.andrewcozzens.com

All images copyright of the artist and used with their permission.

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Justin Favela – Las Vegas, Nevada

Untitled (Big Bird). 2014. Found objects, paper, glue, wire. 3'x9'x6'

Untitled (Big Bird). 2014. Found objects, paper, glue, wire. 3’x9’x6′

Briefly describe the work you do.

I mostly make sculpture out of paper and found objects. I consider myself an interdisciplinary artist that is naturally drawn to expressing ideas three dimensionally.  
Tell us a little about your background and how that influences you as an artist.
I was born and raised in Las Vegas, Nevada. This city is always reinventing itself, which can be difficult for someone as nostalgic and afraid of change as myself. I always find myself longing for the ”good ol’ days” that never really happened. When I think back, my fondest memories are of watching television everyday for hours at a time and listening to stories told at family gatherings. Pop culture and my Guatemalan/Mexican heritage are big influences on my work. 
 
The concept of the “artist studio” has a broad range of meanings, especially in contemporary practice. The idea of the artist toiling away alone in a room may not necessarily reflect what many artists do from day to day anymore. Describe your studio practice and how it differs from (or is the same as) traditional notions of “being in the studio.”
 
I think I have a fairly average studio practice. I work a day job from 9 to 5 and then head to my studio most days. I try to break that up with “research projects” like ‘Taco Takeover’, where I document myself eating tacos at restaurants and also the hours of what I like to call ‘Youtube observations’ are now a part of my practice. 
Lowrider Piñata. 2013. Cardboard, paper, glue. 5'x19.5'x6.5'

Lowrider Piñata. 2013. Cardboard, paper, glue. 5’x19.5’x6.5′

What unique roles do you see yourself as the artist playing that you may not have envisioned yourself in when you first started making art?
I have recently been thinking a lot about my identity as an artist. I was just described as “Las Vegas’ one-man Chicano movement.” That made me a little nervous, not because I don’t identify as Chicano but because I feel like now I am seen as representative for local Chicanos and I don’t want to let them down. I just want everyone to like me… is that too much to ask?
5. When do you find is the best time of day to make art? Do you have time set aside every day, every week or do you just work whenever you can? 
I try to work whenever I can. I am most productive from 5pm to 10pm, especially if there is a food break involved.
 
How has your work changed in the last five years? How is it the same?
My work has been slowly evolving in last 5 years. I have noticed that I am making a lot more large scale piñatas nowadays. I am giving the people what they want. 
 
Donkey Piñata. 2010. mixed media. 4.5'x6'x2.5'

Donkey Piñata. 2010. mixed media. 4.5’x6’x2.5′

Are there people such as family, friends, writers, philosophers or even pop icons that have had an impact on the work you do?

 
My family and circle of extremely supportive friends are a huge influence on my work. My best friend/artist, Thomas Willis, has also been very important in my life. He’s wicked smart, wicked funny and an amazing artist. Art historian, Emmanuel Ortega, has recently become a dear friend that keeps me in check with his knowledge and is making me less ignorant by the minute. As for pop icons, there are so many that impact my work! Here a few that I have been thinking about recently, in no particular order: Paul Mooney, Joan Rivers, Beyoncé, John Goodman, Sarah Silverman, Alyssa Edwards, Whoopi Goldberg, Selena Quintanilla, Lena Dunham, Maria Bamford, Liberace, Don Rickles, and Donny and Marie.
 
If you had an occupation outside of being an artist, what would that be and why?
 
I have been daydreaming of being a stand-up comedian lately. Making people laugh is very important. Stand-up comedy is an escape and a reality check wrapped up into a nice little package, like a 5 dollar foot long sandwich from Subway. I also wanted to be a firefighter when I was kid. Saving lives and cashing checks! 
About
FavelaHeadshotJustin Favela is a Las Vegas native working in the mediums of sculpture, painting and performance. He has participated in numerous group exhibitions in Nevada and nationally. His Las Vegas exhibition venues include the Contemporary Arts Center, Trifecta Gallery, and Gamma Gamma Gallery. Favela‘s work is currently exhibited at Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art as part of the exhibition, “State of the Art: Discovering American Art Now.” He works at Caesars Palace in Las Vegas and earned a B.F.A. in Studio Arts at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas in 2010.
Image4
All images copyright of the artist and used with their permission.
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